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Briefing Papers -
Vol. 10 No. 2: The Re-demarcation and Reapportionment of Parliamentary Constituencies in Ghana
Vol. 10 No. 2: The Re-demarcation and Reapportionment of Parliamentary Constituencies in Ghana
19 October, 2011

In February, 2011, the Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) released provisional results of the 2010 Population and Housing Census. All eyes are now on Ghana’s National Electoral Commission (EC), as it is constitutionally required to use the new census data to determine the allocation, demarcation, and apportionment of parliamentary constituencies in the country. In this essay, I attempt to address—from an admittedly Americanist standpoint1— questions pertaining to legislative representation in Ghana. I argue that the EC is uniquely equipped to carry out its constitutional duty to prescribe the boundaries of the country’s parliamentary constituencies, as mandated under Article 47 of the 1992 Constitution. Yet, as the EC embarks upon its re-demarcation and reapportionment duties, there is good reason for Ghanaians of all political stripes to be concerned. The EC’s decision in 2003 to create 30 additional parliamentary constituencies based on the boundaries of administrative districts is fraught with unsettling representational and political ramifications, yet it has not received the kind of critical scrutiny it deserves.

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