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Critical Perspectives -
Critical Perspectives No. 11 [ Zero Tolerance for Corruption Myth of Reality? ]
Critical Perspectives No. 11 [ Zero Tolerance for Corruption Myth of Reality? ]
01 November, 2002

Critical Perspectives No. 11 [ Zero Tolerance for Corruption Myth of Reality? ]

Zero Tolerance for Corruption Myth of Reality?

By Ken Agyeman Attafuah

In this essay, Dr. Attafuah provides a concise account of the history, nature and effects of corruption in Ghana. He also reviews previous attempts to address the problem and highlights some of the main deficiencies associated with them. Dr. Attafuah describes and acknowledges the breadth of corruption in both the private and public spheres and sets out the challenges that would be encountered in tackling the problem, against the background of the President Kufuor’s declaration of a policy of “zero tolerance for corruption.” Analyzing typical societal responses to corruption and the punishments meted out to corrupt persons through the lens of a criminologist, Dr. Attafuah posits loss of reputation or public shaming, rather than the severity of punishment, as the most effective tool in deterring corruption. While acknowledging the importance of punitive sanctions, he recommends that greater emphasis be placed on preventive measures, promulgation of a living wage, and making administrative procedures more transparent. Dr. Attafuah underscores the importance of adopting comprehensive, multi-faceted and multi-institutional approaches in the fight against the hydra-headed canker of corruption. This line of argument makes highly cogent his advocacy for strengthening the capacity of the Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ) in tandem with other public agencies with anti-corruption mandates such as the police, the judiciary and the Serious Fraud Office (SFO).

Cost GHs 5.00