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Critical Perspectives -
Critical Perspectives No. 9 [Civil Military Relations in Ghana's Fourth Republic ]
Critical Perspectives No. 9 [Civil Military Relations in Ghana's Fourth Republic ]
01 June, 2002

Critical Perspectives No. 9 [Civil Military Relations in Ghana's Fourth Republic ]

Civil Military Relations in Ghana's Fourth Republic

By Baffour Agyeman-Duah

Using Ghana's Fourth Republic as a case study, this paper focuses on several key questions related to civil-military relations. Based on the findings of the 2000 survey of the public's perception and attitudes, the author succeeds in shedding much needed light and bringing fresh perspective on the persistent problem of good governance and democracy in poor countries as well as offering some intelligent practical (policy) suggestions for reforming and improving civil-military relations in Ghana. The author, for example, provides the critical and insightful discussion of some of the measures so far taken by the Kufuor Administration to enhance military professionalism and concludes by looking critically at the possibility of a military coup in Ghana, after examining the problem of the institutionalization of civilian control ("constitutional" or "democratic) of the military. On the general question of civil-military relations, there is, firstly, some evidence, as the author rightly indicates, that the norms of military professionalism and civil control of the armed forces are increasingly being accepted in Ghanaian society, owing, at least in part, to the existing global climate of opinion and the pressure from the international community, against military intervention. Secondly, it appears that in Ghana's Fourth Republic, political and military elites have come to recognize and, perhaps, accept that the institutionalization of civilian control serves their mutual interest; coup leaders and military officers have learned through their long experience in government that there is no quick-fix or easy solution to the problems of poverty and socio-economic and political decline, and that military interventions tend to and has in the past undermined the military's own professionalism, command structure, discipline, coherence and efficiency.

Cost GHs 5.00